IAS Funding & Fellowship Opportunities

The Institute for Advanced Study (Princeton) is an independent private institution founded in 1930 to create a community of scholars focused on intellectual inquiry, free from teaching and other university obligations. Scholars from around the world come to the Institute to pursue their research. Candidates of any nationality may apply for a single term or a full academic year. Scholars may apply for a stipend, but those with sabbatical funding, other grants, retirement funding, or other means are also invited to apply for a non-stipendiary membership. Open to all fields of historical research, the School of Historical Studies’ principal interests is the history of western, near eastern and Asian civilizations, with particular emphasis on Greek and Roman civilization, the history of Europe (medieval, early modern, and modern), the Islamic world, East Asian studies, art history, the history of science, and late modern history. Support is available each year for one scholar in music studies. A Ph.D. (or equivalent) and influential publications are required.

For the current admission cycle, two postdoctoral fellowships in the disciplines of History of Science and Medieval Studies will also be available. Applicants for postdoctoral fellowships must have received their Ph.D. degrees after 1 July 2020 and before 1 September 2022. Postdoc fellowships are for one year and renewable for a second. Residence in Princeton during term time for both members and postdoc fellowships is required. The only other obligation of Members is to pursue their research. Scholars can find further information in the announcement on the web at https://www.hs.ias.edu/mem_announcement or on the School’s website, www.hs.ias.edu. Inquiries by post should be addressed to the School of Historical Studies, Institute for Advanced Study, Einstein Dr., Princeton, N.J. 08540, or by email address: hsappquery@ias.edu.) Deadline: 15 October 2022.

Alhambra Research Opportunity

The Fitzwilliam Museum is recruiting a Research Associate for a short-term project on the Alhambra Palace in the 19th century.
 
The ideal candidate should demonstrate experience in archival research and be proficient in English and Spanish. They should either be working towards a postgraduate research qualification, hold a PhD or have equivalent experience in history of art and/or architecture, history of Spain, or a related field. A brief trip to Spain to attend meetings, and travel to UK-based archives will be required during the assignment. This assignment is advertised as full-time, but part-time applications are welcome. For informal enquiries please email Flavia Ravaioli on fr306@cam.ac.uk

CFP: Association for Contemporary Iberian Studies

We are pleased to announce that ACIS will hold its 43rd annual conference at Universitat de les Illes Balears, Palma de Mallorca, from 7-9 September 2022. The conference will be hosted in a hybrid format by Dr Jesús Revelles Esquirol and the Departament de Filologia Catalana I Linguistica General of Universitat de les Illes Balears. 
You are cordially invited to offer a paper, panel or workshop presentation. The deadline for submission of proposals is Sunday 24th April 2022.  A small number of partial conference fee bursaries are available for postgraduate students. See the full Call for Papers here:  ACIS-CFP-Palma-2022-1.pdf (iberianstudies.net)

Graduate Student Essay Award

Ibero-American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies
Pilar Sáenz Graduate Student Essay Award
Submissions Due: February 15, 2022

The winning paper carries a $500 prize and will be considered
for publication in Dieciocho: Hispanic Enlightenment.
• Submissions may treat any aspect of Iberian or Ibero-American culture during the “long” eighteenth century, from approximately 1680 to 1830.
• Submissions may be based in any academic discipline
(literature, history, art history, anthropology, etc.).
• Submissions must be 5,000 – 6,000 words, including bibliography.
For more information, see the Ibero-American Society for Eighteenth-
Century Studies website: https://iasecs.org/iasecs-prizes-and-grants/

IX Annual Conference on Latin American and Iberian Studies 2022

CALL FOR PAPERS
Saturday, March 26th, 2022
The Department of Language and Literature at Lee University cordially invites submissions for the IX Annual Conference on Latin American and Iberian Studies on Saturday March 26th, 2022. This conference will bring together undergraduate and graduate students and professors from a wide variety of disciplines.

The conference focuses primarily on the languages, literatures, and cultures of Latin America and Spain; however, interdisciplinary submissions will also be accepted from related areas including Service Learning, Cross-Cultural Experiences, foreign language methodology, and others.

We will host a Culture, and Literature Showcase. Please note that this showcase is a smaller, walk-through poster session that will take place during the conference.

We would like to invite students from local high schools to attend the conference along with our Lee students, teachers, and language professors.

If you wish to present, please send a one-page abstract of approximately 250 words as an MS-Word document that clearly identifies the aim(s) of the paper, the rationale of the study, and finding (if applicable). Send the proposal/abstract via email to asteffanell@leeuniversity.edu by February 22nd, 2022. Include your name, institutional affiliation, and email address as well as a brief biography and any kind of technology needed. All presentations will have a 10-12 minute limit.

Abstracts and papers may be submitted in English, Portuguese, Spanish or French. Since one of our goals is to bring undergraduate students and faculty together, papers co-authored by students and faculty advisors will be considered. A $40 registration fee is required for attendance. $25 registration fee for students. This cost will include registration fee, light breakfast, and lunch.

Department of Language and Literature
1120 N Ocoee Street, Cleveland, Tennessee, 37311 Phone: 423-614-8216 Fax: 423-614-8209

Alexander Steffanell, Ph.D.
Professor of Spanish
Latin American Studies, Director
Department of Language and Literature
P.O. Box 3450
Cleveland, TN 37320-3450

Call for papers, Premodern Spanish History Association of the Midwest

We are happy to announce that the Premodern Spanish History Association of the Midwest (PSHAM) is returning with an in-person meeting this upcoming spring! The nineteenth meeting of PSHAM will take place on Saturday, March 19, 2022, hosted by Scott K. Taylor of the University of Kentucky. As usual, we’ll meet at noon for a working lunch and then discuss three pre-circulated works in progress. Many of us will also go out to dinner after the meeting is done.

If you are interested in presenting at PSHAM, please send a brief summary of your paper and a brief cv to Gretchen Starr-LeBeau (gretchen.starrlebeau@principia.edu) or to Valentina Tikoff (vtikoff@depaul.edu) by November 29, 2021.

Even if you don’t want to present, we welcome you to join us! Please RSVP so that we know how many lunches to provide. A little closer to the event we’ll share more details about local hotels, our schedule, etc.

Postgraduate Course: Reading Texts, Reading Objects

Reading Texts, Reading Objects 3: Identity/ Authority. Studying Intercultural Contacts through Primary Sources

Postgraduate Course 2021-2022
Online (Zoom): 2, 4, 11, 16, 18, 30 Nov. 2021
18.00-20.00 CET

Organizers: Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas-Centro de Ciencias Humanas y Sociales (Madrid, Spain); Interdisciplinary Platform Social & Cultural History of the Mediterranean (MEDhis,
https://pti-medhis.csic.es/)

Director: Therese Martin
Co-Director: Katarzyna Starczewska
Secretary: Verónica Abenza

This course is tailored for the needs of graduate students interested in the different types of detailed analysis of a wide range of
primary sources, both written and material. After the warm welcome received by the two previous editions of this course (CCHSCSIC,
2017 and 2018), the researchers of the Interdisciplinary Platform Social & Cultural History of the Mediterranean (MEDhis, https://pti-medhis.csic.es/), together with a group of national and international researchers, offer the third edition of the course. This year the theme will revolve around the issue of self-representation, understood in its
broadest sense as a strategy aimed at highlighting authority. In the written sources, literal descriptions of identity will be analyzed in order to reveal the strategies designed to establish influence over the interlocutor (reader). Special attention will be paid to religious controversy, prologues to translations, scholarly debates, and inquisitorial documents. As for the material and visual sources, objects and representations that reveal the intentionality of the promoters towards the various viewing publics will be studied.
From a detailed reading of the primary sources, the methodological tools designed to answer the following questions will be discussed: how to approach primary sources with a critical eye? How to contextualize the message they give us? What are the theoretical frameworks suitable for researching these artifacts in a cross-cultural and interdisciplinary way? How to evaluate historical “truth” of sources when written and material texts contradict each other?

PROGRAM
DEBATES/ DEBATES

Tuesday, 2 (18.00-20.00 CET)
-Amanda W. Dotseth (Meadows Museum): Telling Tales with Cross-Cultural Objects: Spanish Art in a US Collection.
-Jordi Camps (Museu Nacional d’Art de Catalunya): El objeto representado en la pintura mural románica: Cuestiones de identificación e interpretación de los recipientes sostenidos por la figura de María.

Thursday, 4 (18.00-20.00 CET)
– Silvia Armando (John Cabot University): Ivories and Inventories for Medieval Kings and Bishops: Seeing Authority and Identity in the Treasuries of Sicily and Southern Italy.
-Verónica Abenza (CSIC-CCHS): Los marfiles de Jaca: el diálogo artístico intercultural como fuente de autoridad de la reina Felicia de Roucy.

Thursday, 11 (18.00-20.00 CET)
-Roberta Cerone (Sapienza Università di Roma): Painted Bulls for Monks and Friars. Using the Papal Auctoritas to Strengthen One’s Identity.
-Mirko Vagnoni (Université de Fribourg): Royal Images as Markers of Authority in the Kingdom of Sicily (12th- 14th Centuries).

Tuesday, 16 (18.00-20.00 CET)
-Giulia Arcidiacono (Università di Salento): A Shining Kingdom. Mosaics as a Means of Political Propaganda in Sicily (12th-14th century). Images, Rhetoric, and Ideology.
-Davide Scotto (University of Naples L’Orientale): Christian Understandings of Muslim Identity and Qur’anic Authority. Reading Juan de Segovia’s Preface to the Trilingual Qur’an (1456).

Thursday, 18 (18.00-20.00 CET)
-Miriam Bodian (University of Texas): Interpreting Inquisitorial Defendants’ Self-Descriptions: The Factual and the Strategic.
-Mercedes García-Arenal (CSIC-CCHS): Inquisición, autoridad y polémica: el proceso de Jerónimo de Rojas, morisco de Toledo (1603).

Tuesday, 30 (18.00-20.00 CET)
-Katarzyna Starczewska (CSIC-CCHS): “Aprendí sin maestro todo lo que sé sobre esta lengua”. Discursos y estrategias para reconocer a una autoridad lingüística en el aprendizaje del árabe.
-Ryan Szpiech (University of Michigan): El lenguaje de la identidad: la conversión y otras figuras lingüísticas.

Postgraduate Course: Reading Texts, Reading Objects

Reading Texts, Reading Objects 3: Identity/ Authority. Studying Intercultural Contacts through Primary Sources

Postgraduate Course 2021-2022
Online (Zoom): 2, 4, 11, 16, 18, 30 Nov. 2021
18.00-20.00 CET

Organizers: Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas-Centro de Ciencias Humanas y Sociales (Madrid, Spain); Interdisciplinary Platform Social & Cultural History of the Mediterranean (MEDhis,
https://pti-medhis.csic.es/)

Director: Therese Martin
Co-Director: Katarzyna Starczewska
Secretary: Verónica Abenza

This course is tailored for the needs of graduate students interested in the different types of detailed analysis of a wide range of
primary sources, both written and material. After the warm welcome received by the two previous editions of this course (CCHSCSIC,
2017 and 2018), the researchers of the Interdisciplinary Platform Social & Cultural History of the Mediterranean (MEDhis, https://pti-medhis.csic.es/), together with a group of national and international researchers, offer the third edition of the course. This year the theme will revolve around the issue of self-representation, understood in its
broadest sense as a strategy aimed at highlighting authority. In the written sources, literal descriptions of identity will be analyzed in order to reveal the strategies designed to establish influence over the interlocutor (reader). Special attention will be paid to religious controversy, prologues to translations, scholarly debates, and inquisitorial documents. As for the material and visual sources, objects and representations that reveal the intentionality of the promoters towards the various viewing publics will be studied.
From a detailed reading of the primary sources, the methodological tools designed to answer the following questions will be discussed: how to approach primary sources with a critical eye? How to contextualize the message they give us? What are the theoretical frameworks suitable for researching these artifacts in a cross-cultural and interdisciplinary way? How to evaluate historical “truth” of sources when written and material texts contradict each other?

PROGRAM
DEBATES/ DEBATES

Tuesday, 2 (18.00-20.00 CET)
-Amanda W. Dotseth (Meadows Museum): Telling Tales with Cross-Cultural Objects: Spanish Art in a US Collection.
-Jordi Camps (Museu Nacional d’Art de Catalunya): El objeto representado en la pintura mural románica: Cuestiones de identificación e interpretación de los recipientes sostenidos por la figura de María.

Thursday, 4 (18.00-20.00 CET)
– Silvia Armando (John Cabot University): Ivories and Inventories for Medieval Kings and Bishops: Seeing Authority and Identity in the Treasuries of Sicily and Southern Italy.
-Verónica Abenza (CSIC-CCHS): Los marfiles de Jaca: el diálogo artístico intercultural como fuente de autoridad de la reina Felicia de Roucy.

Thursday, 11 (18.00-20.00 CET)
-Roberta Cerone (Sapienza Università di Roma): Painted Bulls for Monks and Friars. Using the Papal Auctoritas to Strengthen One’s Identity.
-Mirko Vagnoni (Université de Fribourg): Royal Images as Markers of Authority in the Kingdom of Sicily (12th- 14th Centuries).

Tuesday, 16 (18.00-20.00 CET)
-Giulia Arcidiacono (Università di Salento): A Shining Kingdom. Mosaics as a Means of Political Propaganda in Sicily (12th-14th century). Images, Rhetoric, and Ideology.
-Davide Scotto (University of Naples L’Orientale): Christian Understandings of Muslim Identity and Qur’anic Authority. Reading Juan de Segovia’s Preface to the Trilingual Qur’an (1456).

Thursday, 18 (18.00-20.00 CET)
-Miriam Bodian (University of Texas): Interpreting Inquisitorial Defendants’ Self-Descriptions: The Factual and the Strategic.
-Mercedes García-Arenal (CSIC-CCHS): Inquisición, autoridad y polémica: el proceso de Jerónimo de Rojas, morisco de Toledo (1603).

Tuesday, 30 (18.00-20.00 CET)
-Katarzyna Starczewska (CSIC-CCHS): “Aprendí sin maestro todo lo que sé sobre esta lengua”. Discursos y estrategias para reconocer a una autoridad lingüística en el aprendizaje del árabe.
-Ryan Szpiech (University of Michigan): El lenguaje de la identidad: la conversión y otras figuras lingüísticas.

Curso livre “História de Lisboa: espaços e sociabilidades”

Curso livre “História de Lisboa: espaços e sociabilidades”

9 outubro de 2021 a 29 de janeiro de 2022
Curso em regime misto, presencial e/ou remoto

Apresentação:
O impacte historiográfico gerado pelo colóquio internacional “Lisboa Iluminista e o seu Tempo”, realizado em 1994, inspirou a criação, sob coordenação do Professor Doutor José-Augusto França e iniciativa da Universidade Autónoma de Lisboa (UAL), do primeiro curso de Estudos Olisiponenses, “Lisboa: Urbanismo e História”, cujo êxito sucessivas edições viriam a consagrar. Se o colóquio de 1994 se assumiu como motivação imediata de uma nova aposta formativa, já a sua razão profunda se escora na tradição historiográfica que, nascida com Júlio de Castilho nos finais de Oitocentos, haveria de tomar o nome de Olisipografia, mas cujos antecedentes se vislumbram já nos meados do séc. XVI, com Damião de Góis. Marco essencial na consolidação dos Estudos Olisiponenses seria protagonizado pelo Instituto de História da Arte da Faculdade de Ciências Sociais e Humanas da Universidade Nova de Lisboa (IHA/FCSH-UNL), através da criação de cursos livres de Estudos de Lisboa e, mais recentemente, de um grupo de investigação especificamente vocacionado para este corpus temático. Assumindo heranças e precedências, mas não indiferente ao devir histórico e historiográfico, entende a iniciativa que ora se apresenta, rendendo justa homenagem ao Professor José-Augusto França, reativar os cursos de Estudos Olisiponenses dos anos 90, imprimindo-lhes, contudo, um espírito novo, insuflado pelo contributo conjugado de investigadores de gerações e formações diversificadas, cujos trabalhos permitem oferecer uma estrutura concetual apelativa e atualizada. Numa parceria entre a UAL e o IHA, favorecedora da convergência e cruzamento de experiências e tradições académicas, a presente edição é reflexo da evolução das perspetivas metodológicas, dos domínios temáticos e da produção teórica relativos à Olisipografia, bem assim da evolução da própria história da cidade de Lisboa e dos interesses e expetativas do público. Sob o título geral “História de Lisboa: espaços e sociabilidades”, integra catorze sessões, cujas matrizes de análise se estendem desde a arquitetura e o urbanismo à iconografia, sociologia, política e antropologia. O curso inicia com um primeiro núcleo de palestras, “Lisboa, cidade global”, que proporciona uma perspetiva diacrónica essencial a uma visão panorâmica da história da urbe. Um segundo núcleo, “Novos estudos sobre Lisboa”, versará aspetos inovadores, seja pelo tema, seja pelo referencial teórico adotado, do pensar e estudar a cidade. A formação será complementada por uma sessão cinematográfica sobre Lisboa e por uma visita temática orientada por um dos docentes.

Destinatários:
Interessados na História de Lisboa; profissionais de museus e do património cultural; comunidade académica, público em geral

Objetivos:
Oferecer um conhecimento atualizado e cientificamente sustentado da história da cidade de Lisboa.
Favorecer uma visão poliédrica da cidade, apresentando temas inovadores e abordagens recentes e pluridisciplinares.
Proporcionar a análise crítica das dinâmicas urbanas olisiponenses ao longo da História.

Funcionamento do curso:
O curso compõe-se de catorze sessões, ministradas em língua portuguesa, perfazendo um total de vinte e oito horas, complementadas por uma visita temática e por uma sessão cinematográfica.
As sessões têm a duração de duas horas, período que compreende uma componente expositiva, ministrada pelo docente/palestrante, e uma outra, de cerca de meia hora, de debate relativo ao tema da sessão, baseado nas questões apresentadas pelos participantes e moderado pelo docente/palestrante.
A assistência ao curso poderá assumir a modalidade presencial ou, alternativamente, remota, de acordo com as condições de saúde pública e com a preferência dos destinatários.
As aulas serão ministradas na sede da Universidade Autónoma de Lisboa, Palácio dos Condes de Redondo, Rua de Santa Marta n.º 56, 1169-023 Lisboa, no Auditório II, e contarão com a participação de todos os inscritos que optem pela modalidade de assistência presencial. Os participantes que escolham o regime remoto assistirão às sessões através da plataforma ZOOM, mediante credenciais de acesso a fornecer oportunamente.
A visita temática e a sessão cinematográfica decorrerão em data a definir e estarão abertas a todos os inscritos.
Os participantes que tiverem assistido a um mínimo de 75% das sessões terão direito à obtenção de uma Certificado de Frequência.

Preços e inscrições:

Princeton Institute for Advanced Study, Opportunities for Scholars

INSTITUTE FOR ADVANCED STUDY, School of Historical Studies, Opportunities for Scholars 2022-2023. The Institute is an independent private institution founded in 1930 to create a community of scholars focused on intellectual inquiry, free from teaching and other university obligations. Scholars from around the world come to the Institute to pursue their research. Candidates of any nationality may apply for a single term or a full academic year. Scholars may apply for a stipend, but those with sabbatical funding, other grants, retirement funding, or other means are also invited to apply for a non-stipendiary membership. Some short-term visitorships (for less than a full term and without stipend) are also available on an ad-hoc basis. Open to all fields of historical research, the School of Historical Studies’ principal interests is the history of western, near eastern and Asian civilizations, with particular emphasis upon Greek and Roman civilization, the history of Europe (medieval, early modern, and modern), the Islamic world, East Asian studies, art history, the history of science, and late modern history. Support is available each year for one scholar in music studies. Residence in Princeton during term time is required. The only other obligation of Members is to pursue their research. A Ph.D. (or equivalent) and substantial publications are required. Scholars can find further information in the announcement on the web at https://www.hs.ias.edu/mem_announcement or on the School’s website, www.hs.ias.edu. Inquiries sent by post should be addressed to the School of Historical Studies, Institute for Advanced Study, Einstein Dr., Princeton, N.J. 08540 (Email address: hsappquery@ias.edu.) Deadline: October 15, 2021.